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CRS Cut-Off Threshold Decreases on July 12 Express Entry Draw

Candidates in the Express Entry pool for immigration to Canada with 440 or more Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points have been invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence in the July 12 Express Entry draw. A total of 3,202 candidates has invited this time around.

The CRS cut-off threshold has decreased by nine points since the previous draw, which took place on June 28.

Today’s draw is the second to have taken place since changes were made to the CRS last month. Following those changes, and as CICNews explained a couple of weeks ago, it was expected that the CRS threshold would go up temporarily to allow for the fact that some candidates in the pool, specifically those with a sibling in Canada and those with French ability, received a boost in their score last month. In addition, the longer-than-usual gap between draws last month would have also been a contributing factor to the threshold going up before the June 28 draw.

While the threshold has not decreased again to its historic low of 413 or beyond, candidates remaining in the pool may take heart that the threshold has indeed decreased on this occasion — even more so when it is also taken into account that there were slightly fewer Invitations to Apply (ITAs) issued this time around than previously.

Following the July 12 draw, a total of 54,487 ITAs has been issued so far in 2017, far surpassing the total that was issued in the whole of last year. According to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), Express Entry is now the main driver of economic immigration to Canada.

*Note: Draws of May 26 invited provincial nominees with a minimum CRS score of 775, and candidates in the Federal Skilled Trades Class with a minimum score of 199.

 

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        0        2017/Jul/13

Tasmania has introduced Provisional Visa

          Australian state Tasmania has introduced Skilled Regional (Provisional) Visa (sub class 489) for offshore applicants. From 1 July 2017, Tasmania has started issuing nominations under this category. 

        Tasmania's Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa gives the option to the applicant to become a permanent resident of Australia. The visa is issued for 4 years, allowing the visa holders to live and work in the territory. After a stay of at least 2 years and full-time work (35 hours per week) for at least year; permanent residence can be applied. 

         Like all other Australian states and territories; Tasmania also follows its own occupation list. Applicant's occupation should be listed in Tasmania's occupation list to apply for this category. Getting a nomination from Tasmania will give 10 points to the applicant. Once the nomination is received then visa can be filled with Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP).

       If you are looking to immigrate to Canada, get in touch with Croyez Immigration Services one of the leading immigration consultancy firm in India.

 

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        0        2017/Jul/17

New Record Low Express Entry Minimum CRS Requirement: 431

For the fourth time this year, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) have set a new record low point requirement for Express Entry candidates to receive an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for Canadian permanent residence. In the latest draw, which took place on April 5, candidates with 431 or more Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points received an ITA.

A total of 3,753 candidates received an ITA in this latest round of invitations.

The previous record low had been set in the March 1 draw, when candidates with 434 or more CRS points were invited. In the interim period since then, another draw took place with a CRS cut-off of 441 points, and IRCC then announced that it would implement some changes to the CRS as of this coming June.

crs 5 April

ita 5 April

The April 5 draw is the first draw of the second quarter of 2017. It follows a remarkable first quarter, during which the number of ITAs issued increased dramatically over any other period in the history of Express Entry, which was first launched in January 2015.

Earlier this week, Attorney David Cohen was quoted as saying that “if draw sizes remain relatively large . . . we may see lower CRS thresholds deeper into 2017.”

Following the April 5 draw, Attorney Cohen added that “it is clear that large draw sizes and decreasing CRS cut-off thresholds are linked. We can look forward to more invitations being issued through the second quarter of this year and beyond.”

The opening months of 2017 have been a groundbreaking period in the history of Canada’s Express Entry immigration selection system. More candidates are being invited to apply than ever before, processing times remain short, and successful applicants continue to land in Canada as permanent residents. This quarterly review will take stock of the year so far, while also looking forward to what may come in the future.

Through the opening three months of 2017, a total of 24,652 Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for permanent residence have been issued by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), an increase of more than 160 percent on the 9,465 ITAs issued over the first quarter of 2016. For the same period in 2015, a total of 6,851 ITAs were issued.

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itas

crs-17-16-15

Other factors contributing towards this increase include a reduction in the backlog of applications submitted under the federal economic immigration programs before Express Entry was launched, as well as Canada’s Immigration Plan for 2017, which targets more newcomers through these programs — now managed through Express Entry — than ever before.

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        4        2017/Apr/13

Latest BC Draw Invites 458 Graduates and Workers to Apply to Immigrate

On April 5, 2017, the province of British Columbia (BC) invited 458 workers and international graduates to apply to the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP). Candidates in five sub-categories managed through the Skills Immigration Registration System (SIRS) were issued Invitations to Apply (ITA) for a provincial nomination certificate, with which they may then apply to the federal government for Canadian permanent resident status. This most recent draw represents the biggest so far in 2017 to be conducted upon the five sub-categories within the Skills Immigration and Express Entry BC streams which are managed through the SIRS.

The SIRS is a points-based system that ranks and selects eligible candidates across a range of sub-categories. When an eligible candidate registers through SIRS, he or she is assigned a points score and enters a selection pool for the category in which he or she has registered (candidates may register under one category only). Top-ranking candidates have issued ITAs in periodic draws conducted by the province. It is important to note that the ITA with respect to the BC PNP is different to the ITA issued at the federal level in an Express Entry draw

April 5 BC PNP Draw

Stream/category Minimum score Number of invitations Aligned with Express Entry?
Express Entry BC – Skilled Worker 85 82 Yes
Express Entry BC – International Graduate 70 79 Yes
Skills Immigration – Skilled Worker 80 166 No
Skills Immigration – International Graduate 70 72 No
Skills Immigration – Entry Level and Semi-Skilled 45 59 No

Express Entry BC Stream

This stream of the BC PNP is aligned with the Express Entry system, and applications under this stream may receive priority processing at the provincial and federal levels. Consequently, individuals in this stream must be eligible for one of the three Federal economic programs — Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), Canadian Experience Class (CEC), or Federal Skilled Trades Class (FSTC) — in order to enter the federal Express Entry pool. Individuals in the Express Entry pool who have a provincial nomination certificate from BC receive 600 points under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS), which means the individual will receive an ITA in a subsequent Express Entry draw.

Express Entry BC – Skilled Worker

The Express Entry BC – Skilled Worker category is for international skilled workers who have post-secondary education or training and employment experience in a professional, management, technical, trade or other skilled occupation. Candidates must be eligible to enter the federal Express Entry pool. This category is aligned with the federal Express Entry system.

Express Entry BC – International Graduate

International graduates who have graduated from a Canadian university or college within the past two years may be eligible to apply under the Express Entry BC – International Graduate category. Interestingly, this category is open to eligible graduates who graduated from a university or college in any location in Canada; it is not restricted to graduates from BC universities and colleges. This category is also aligned with the federal Express Entry system.

Skills Immigration – Skilled Worker

This base category is open to workers with post-secondary education or training and employment experience in a skilled occupation. A job offer is required.

Skills Immigration – International Graduate

This category is for international students who have graduated from a Canadian university or college within two years of applying to the BC PNP. While applicants do not necessarily need prior work experience, applicants are required to obtain a job offer from a B.C. employer.

Skills Immigration – Entry Level and Semi-Skilled

This category is open to candidates who may not be eligible for other Canadian immigration programs, as it allows certain non-skilled workers to apply for permanent residence. Candidates must work in an eligible occupation within the tourism/hospitality, long-haul trucking, or food processing industries, or in a NOC skill level C or D occupation in the Northeast Development Region of the province.

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        0        2017/Apr/13

Malala Yousafzai Receives Honorary Canadian Citizenship

Thirty months after she first due to accepting honorary Canadian citizenship, Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai has finally addressed Parliament upon becoming just the sixth person ever to receive the distinction.

Ms. Yousafzai, a citizen of Pakistan, was originally scheduled to be granted the honor by former prime minister Stephen Harper on the day a gunman stormed Parliament Hill on October 22, 2014.

Today, the education activist who survived a Taliban assassination attempt and subsequently became an international icon for women's and children's rights, called on Canada to lead a global effort to prioritize education for girls and refugees. Towards this end, Ms. Yousafzai asked the government of Canada to make girls’ education a central theme of its G7 presidency in 2018.

"I stand with girls, as someone who knows how it feels to have your right to education taken away and your dreams threatened," said Ms. Yousafzai. "I know where I stand. If you stand with me, I ask you to seize every opportunity for girls’ education over the next year.

"The world needs leadership based on serving humanity – not based on how many weapons you have. Canada can take that lead."

Raising laughter from the gathered politicians, press, and other dignitaries, Ms. Yousafzai added that she had been nervously excited to meet Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, who attended an honorary Canadian citizenship ceremony for Ms. Yousafzai prior to her speech in Parliament.

Ms. Yousafzai, 19, survived a Taliban assassination attempt in 2012 as she was leaving school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. She was targeted for her campaign against efforts to deny women a formal education. She now lives in London, UK, where she received medical treatment following the incident.

Honorary Canadian citizenship is a purely symbolic honor. The recipient does not take the Oath of Citizenship and does not receive any rights, privileges, or duties typically held by a Canadian citizen.

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        1        2017/Apr/14

Biggest Ever Express Entry Draw Issues 3,923 Invitations to Apply, Minimum CRS Score at 423

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) have broken two of its own records in its most recent Express Entry draw, which took place on April 12, 2017. This draw saw more Invitations to Apply (ITAs) issued to candidates in the Express Entry pool than any other single draw since the Express Entry system was introduced in January 2015. Moreover, the minimum Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score a candidate needed in order receive an ITA dropped to 423, the lowest yet required.

Candidates who received an ITA in this draw are now in a position to submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status to the federal government. Accompanying family members, including spouses or common-law partners, as well as dependent children, may also come to Canada along with the principal applicant. IRCC aims to process complete submitted applications within six months.

The opening months of 2017 have witnessed a series of decreasing CRS requirements and increasing numbers of ITAs issued. This followed predictions made by IRCC towards the end of 2016 that changes to the Express Entry system and the CRS would result in a greater number of ITAs being issued, and consequently a drop in the CRS score requirement.

CRS Requirement

Number of ITAs in latest draw

ITAs issued in 2017

423 3,923 32,308

In order to be in a position to receive an ITA in an Express Entry draw, individuals are first required to meet the eligibility criteria of one of the three immigration programs managed through the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), Federal Skilled Trades Class (FTSC), or Canadian Experience Class (CEC). Upon entering the pool, candidates are assigned a CRS score based on factors including civil status information, education, work experience, language ability, and other criteria. This score determines their ranking in the pool. During periodic draws, IRCC issues ITAs to the highest-ranking candidates. Those candidates who receive an ITA  may submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status.

Express Entry quick facts, from January 1, 2015, to March 24, 2017

  • Launch date: January 1, 2015
  • First draw from the pool: January 31, 2015
  • Most recent draw from the pool: April 12, 2017
  • Minimum CRS points required for selection in any one draw: 423 (April 12, 2017)
  • Largest number of invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 3,923 (April 12, 2017)
  • Fewest invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 559 (November 30, 2016. Note: This draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Largest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 273 (from May 22, 2015, to June 12, 2015, draws)
  • Smallest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • The largest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 316 (from November 16, 2016, to November 30. Note: The latter draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Smallest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • Longest gap between two consecutive draws: 35 days (from April 17, 2015, to May 22, 2015, draws)
  • Shortest gap between two consecutive draws: 6 days (from December 16 to December 22, 2016)
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2015: 31,063
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2016: 33,782
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2017: 32,308
  • Total number of ITAs issued since system was launched: 97,153

Draws From The Express Entry Pool (Updated)

Express Entry Draws: 2017

Draw # Minimum CRS Score Required Date of Draw # of ITAs Issued
59 423 April 12, 2017 3,923
58 431 April 5, 2017 3,753
57 441 March 24, 2017 3,749
56 434 March 1, 2017 3,884
55 441 February 22, 2017 3,611
54 447 February 8, 2017 3,664
53 453 January 25, 2017 3,508
52 459 January 11, 2017 3,334
51 468 January 4. 2017 2,902

 

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        1        2017/Apr/20

April 19 Express Entry Draw Sees Lowest CRS Requirement Yet at 415

The latest Express Entry draw, which took place on April 19, 2017, has issued 3,665 Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent resident status to candidates in the Express Entry pool with Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) scores of 415 or above. Marking the lowest CRS requirement yet, this draw brings the total number of ITAs issued since the introduction of the Express Entry system in January 2015, to over 100,000.

So far in the first four months of 2017, 35,973 ITAs have been issued. This is higher than the total number of ITAs issued during the year of 2016. Candidates who received an ITA in this draw are now in a position to submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status to the federal government. Accompanying family members, including spouses or common-law partners, as well as dependent children, may also come to Canada along with the principal applicant. IRCC aims to process complete submitted applications within six months.

The opening months of 2017 have witnessed a series of decreasing CRS requirements and increasing numbers of ITAs issued. This followed predictions made by IRCC towards the end of 2016 that changes to the Express Entry system and the CRS would result in a greater number of ITAs being issued, and consequently a drop in the CRS score requirement.

CRS Requirement

Number of ITAs in latest draw

ITAs issued in 201

 415 3,665  35,973

In order to be in a position to receive an ITA in an Express Entry draw, individuals are first required to meet the eligibility criteria of one of the three immigration programs managed through the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), Federal Skilled Trades Class (FTSC), or Canadian Experience Class (CEC). Upon entering the pool, candidates are assigned a CRS score based on factors including civil status information, education, work experience, language ability, and other criteria. This score determines their ranking in the pool. During periodic draws, IRCC issues ITAs to the highest-ranking candidates. Those candidates who receive an ITA  may submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status.

Express Entry quick facts, from January 1, 2015, to April 19, 2017

  • Launch date: January 1, 2015
  • First draw from the pool: January 31, 2015
  • Most recent draw from the pool: April 19, 2017
  • Minimum CRS points required for selection in any one draw: 415 (April 19, 2017)
  • Largest number of invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 3,923 (April 12, 2017)
  • Fewest invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 559 (November 30, 2016. Note: This draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Largest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 273 (from May 22, 2015, to June 12, 2015, draws)
  • Smallest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • The largest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 316 (from November 16, 2016, to November 30. Note: The latter draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Smallest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • Longest gap between two consecutive draws: 35 days (from April 17, 2015, to May 22, 2015, draws)
  • Shortest gap between two consecutive draws: 6 days (from December 16 to December 22, 2016)
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2015: 31,063
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2016: 33,782
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2017: 35,973
  • Total number of ITAs issued since system was launched: 100,818

Draws From The Express Entry Pool (Updated)

Express Entry Draws: 2017

Draw # Minimum CRS Score Required Date of Draw # of ITAs Issued
60
415
April 19, 2017 3,665
59 423 April 12, 2017 3,923
58 431 April 5, 2017 3,753
57 441 March 24, 2017 3,749
56 434 March 1, 2017 3,884
55 441 February 22, 2017 3,611
54 447 February 8, 2017 3,664
53 453 January 25, 2017 3,508
52 459 January 11, 2017 3,334
51 468 January 4. 2017 2,902

 

 

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        1        2017/May/05

3,796 Invitations to Apply for Canadian Permanent Residence Issued in May 4 Express Entry Draw

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) have issued Invitations to Apply (ITAs) to 3,796 candidates in the Express Entry pool in its latest draw, which took place on May 4, 2017. Candidates in the pool with Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) scores of 423 or above at the time of the draw are now in a position to apply for Canadian permanent resident status. Although the minimum required CRS score was slightly higher than that of the previous draw, which took place on April 19, a greater number of ITAs were issued this time around.

 

 

 

So far in 2017, 39,769 ITAs have been issued — more than the total number of ITAs issued during the year of 2016. Candidates who received an ITA in this draw are now in a position to submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status to the federal government. Accompanying family members, including spouses or common-law partners, as well as dependent children, may also come to Canada along with the principal applicant. IRCC aims to process complete submitted applications within six months.The opening months of 2017 have witnessed a series of decreasing CRS requirements and increasing numbers of ITAs issued. This followed predictions made by IRCC towards the end of 2016 that changes to the Express Entry system and the CRS would result in a greater number of ITAs being issued, and consequently a drop in the CRS score requirement.

CRS Requirement

Number of ITAs in latest draw

ITAs issued in 2017

423 3,796  39,769

In order to be in a position to receive an ITA in an Express Entry draw, individuals are first required to meet the eligibility criteria of one of the three immigration programs managed through the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), Federal Skilled Trades Class (FTSC), or Canadian Experience Class (CEC). Upon entering the pool, candidates are assigned a CRS score based on factors including civil status information, education, work experience, language ability, and other criteria. This score determines their ranking in the pool. During periodic draws, IRCC issues ITAs to the highest-ranking candidates. Those candidates who receive an ITA  may submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status.

Express Entry quick facts, from January 1, 2015, to May 4, 2017

  • Launch date: January 1, 2015
  • First draw from the pool: January 31, 2015
  • Most recent draw from the pool: May 4, 2017
  • Minimum CRS points required for selection in any one draw: 415 (April 19, 2017)
  • Largest number of invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 3,923 (April 12, 2017)
  • Fewest invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 559 (November 30, 2016. Note: This draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Largest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 273 (from May 22, 2015 to June 12, 2015 draws)
  • Smallest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • Largest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 316 (from November 16, 2016 to November 30. Note: The latter draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Smallest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • Longest gap between two consecutive draws: 35 days (from April 17, 2015 to May 22, 2015 draws)
  • Shortest gap between two consecutive draws: 6 days (from December 16 to December 22, 2016)
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2015: 31,063
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2016: 33,782
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2017: 39,769
  • Total number of ITAs issued since system was launched: 104,614

Draws From The Express Entry Pool (Updated)

Express Entry Draws: 2017

Draw #

Minimum CRS Score Required

Date of Draw

# of ITAs Issued

61 423 May 4, 2017 3,769
60 415 April 19, 2017 3,665
59 423 April 12, 2017 3,923
58 431 April 5, 2017 3,753
57 441 March 24, 2017 3,749
56 434 March 1, 2017 3,884
55 441 February 22, 2017 3,611
54 447 February 8, 2017 3,664
53 453 January 25, 2017 3,508
52 459 January 11, 2017 3,334
51 468 January 4. 2017 2,902

 

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        0        2017/Jun/10

Maximum Age of Dependent Children to be Raised to 21 and Under

As of October 24, 2017, the maximum age of dependent children who may be included in an application for immigration to Canada will rise to include children under the age of 22, who are not themselves married or in a common-law relationship. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) confirmed the change in its official Gazette of May 3, 2017. Currently, the definition of a dependent child covers children under the age of 19 — a regulation that the Canadian government has criticized for being 'too restrictive'.

The current definition will continue to apply to applications submitted on August 1, 2014, to October 23, 2017. The new definition of a dependent child will only apply to applications submitted from October 24 onward. IRCC explained that applying the definition change retroactively may cause delays in approving existing applications for permanent residence across various immigration programs. However, it was clarified that individuals who submitted an application on or before July 31, 2014, and who have their application still in process, would be subject to the definition of dependent child that was in place at the time they submitted their application.

Prioritizing family reunification

The previous Conservative government lowered the maximum age for dependent children on August 1, 2014. Before that date, from June 28, 2002, to July 31, 2014, the maximum age was set at less than 22 years of age. Consequently, the planned change to the regulations reverts the maximum age back to its previous definition.

In the lead-up to the general election last fall, the Liberal Party (currently in office) declared its commitment to family reunification. This commitment has been reiterated time and again since the Liberals came to power, and this latest proposed change is aimed at supporting these commitments. IRCC first announced its intention to change the definition of dependent children in autumn, 2016.

Raising the age of dependent children who may be included on an application to immigrate to Canada is seen as a key factor in keeping families together. In its announcement of the upcoming change, IRCC stated, 'A primary objective of this regulatory amendment is to enhance family unity and reunification by enabling Canadians and permanent residents to bring their young adult children between 19 and 21 years of age to Canada... When families are able to remain together as an economic household unit, their integration into Canada and their ability to work and contribute to their communities all improve.' 

A further rationale for the upcoming definition change is based on the trend that children are remaining dependent on their parents for longer, often pursuing post-secondary education. Consequently, this regulatory change is expected to facilitate immigration for these young individuals aged 19 to 21, who are not currently able to join their parents on an immigration application. IRCC acknowledges that many children aged between 19 and 21 may not be eligible to apply for Canadian permanent resident status under an economic immigration program, essentially denying them the opportunity to join their family in Canada. While the minimum age for principal applicants under Canadian economic immigration programs is usually 18, many young people may not yet have the required education or work experience to make an application. Therefore, an explicit objective of this proposed change is to enable these young people to obtain permanent resident status while pursuing their studies and remaining with their families.

 

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        0        2017/Jun/10

Ontario to Issue Express Entry Notifications of Interest on Weekly Basis

The government of Ontario will issue Notifications of Interest (NOIs) to Express Entry candidates who are eligible for Ontario’s Express Entry Human Capital Priorities (HCP) stream on a weekly basis. This stream is part of the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP).

Prospective applicants are encouraged to create a new Express Entry profile to make it easier for Ontario to identify their profile during its search of the pool. Candidates who create a new profile must delete their old profile.

Successful applicants are awarded 600 additional Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points and placed at the front of the line to issue an Invitation To Apply (ITA) for permanent residence in a subsequent draw from the Express Entry pool.

To be eligible under the Ontario Human Capital Priorities stream, candidates must:

  • Have a profile in the Express Entry pool and score a minimum of 400 points under the CRS. The score must remain at or above 400 during both the Ontario nomination processing stage and at the federal application for permanent residence processing stage;
  • Have a minimum level of work experience;
    • Candidates who choose to be assessed against the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC) criteria must have at least one year of continuous and full-time employment experience, or part-time equivalent, in a National Occupation Classification (NOC) level 0, A, or B occupation in the five years prior to the date of the Notification of Interest from the OINP.
    • Candidates who choose to be assessed against the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) criteria must have at least one year of cumulative and full-time employment experience, or part-time equivalent, in an NOC 0, A, or B occupation in Canada in the three years prior to the date of the NOI from the OINP.
  • Have a Canadian Bachelor’s, Master’s or Ph.D. degree OR an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report produced by a designated organization indicating that their foreign education credential is equivalent to a Canadian Bachelor’s, Master’s or Ph.D.;
  • Demonstrate English or French language proficiency level of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7 or above in all four competencies (speaking, reading, writing, and listening);
  • Intend to reside in Ontario;
  • Possess sufficient funds to cover settlement costs in Ontario; and
  • Meet the additional criteria under either the FSWP or CEC.

Once an NOI is issued, the invited candidate has six months to register on Ontario’s online application system and submit the application. Once registered, the candidate has 14 days to submit the application.

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        0        2017/Jun/10

BC Invites 364 Workers and Graduates to Apply for Provincial Nomination

On May 10, 2017, the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP) invited 364 workers and graduates to apply for a provincial nomination certificate. This represents an increase of 77 percent in the number of candidates invited in five sub-categories managed through the Skills Immigration Registration System (SIRS), compared to the previous draw on April 19. These individuals have received an Invitation to Apply (ITA) from BC and are now in a position to submit an application for a provincial nomination certificate, with which they may then apply to the federal government for Canadian permanent resident status.

The SIRS is a points-based system that ranks and selects eligible candidates across a range of sub-categories. When an eligible candidate registers through SIRS, he or she is assigned a points score and enters a selection pool for the category in which he or she has registered (candidates may register under one category only). Top-ranking candidates have issued ITAs in periodic draws conducted by the province. 

The draw on May 10 saw the minimum score a candidate needs in order to receive an ITA drop in the Skills Immigration — Skilled Worker and Skills Immigration — International graduate sub-categories, compared to the last draw.

 

May 10 BC PNP Draw

Stream/category Minimum score Number of invitations Aligned with Express Entry?
Express Entry BC – Skilled Worker 90 78 Yes
Express Entry BC – International Graduate 85 55 Yes
Skills Immigration – Skilled Worker 85 114 No
Skills Immigration – International Graduate 80 70 No
Skills Immigration – Entry Level and Semi-Skilled 60 47 No

Express Entry BC Stream

This stream of the BC PNP is aligned with the Express Entry system, and applications under this stream may receive priority processing at the provincial and federal levels. Consequently, individuals in this stream must be eligible for one of the three Federal economic programs — Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), Canadian Experience Class (CEC), or Federal Skilled Trades Class (FSTC) — in order to enter the federal Express Entry pool. Individuals in the Express Entry pool who have a provincial nomination certificate from BC receive 600 points under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS), which means the individual will receive an ITA in a subsequent Express Entry draw.

Express Entry BC – Skilled Worker

The Express Entry BC – Skilled Worker category is for international skilled workers who have post-secondary education or training and employment experience in a professional, management, technical, trade or other skilled occupation. Candidates must be eligible to enter the federal Express Entry pool. This category is aligned with the federal Express Entry system.

Express Entry BC – International Graduate

International graduates who have graduated from a Canadian university or college within the past two years may be eligible to apply under the Express Entry BC – International Graduate category. Interestingly, this category is open to eligible graduates who graduated from a university or college in any location in Canada; it is not restricted to graduates from BC universities and colleges. This category is also aligned with the federal Express Entry system.

Skills Immigration – Skilled Worker

This base category is open to workers with post-secondary education or training and employment experience in a skilled occupation. A job offer is required.

Skills Immigration – International Graduate

This category is for international students who have graduated from a Canadian university or college within two years of applying to the BC PNP. While applicants do not necessarily need prior work experience, applicants are required to obtain a job offer from a B.C. employer.

Skills Immigration – Entry Level and Semi-Skilled

This category is open to candidates who may not be eligible for other Canadian immigration programs, as it allows certain non-skilled workers to apply for permanent residence. Candidates must work in an eligible occupation within the tourism/hospitality, long-haul trucking, or food processing industries, or in an NOC skill level C or D occupation in the Northeast Development Region of the province.

 

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        0        2017/Jun/10

IRCC Now Ranking Candidates in Express Entry Pool with Tied CRS Scores by Time of Profile Submission

The Express Entry system is now able to rank candidates in the Express Entry pool with tied scores under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) according to the date and time they submitted their profile. Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) introduced this feature, along with other changes to the CRS, on June 6, 2017.

Candidates in the Express Entry pool continue to be ranked according to their CRS score, as has always been the case since the introduction of Express Entry in January 2015. However, this update enables candidates with tied scores to be ranked with greater precision. Profiles submitted earlier are ranked higher, while recent profile submissions are ranked lower. IRCC has clarified that updating a profile will not change the time stamp of the original submission, however, if a candidate withdraws his or her profile and creates a new one, or if a candidate's profile expires and he or she submits a new one, the time and date stamp of the original profile submission will be lost.

In order to be in a position to receive an Invitation to Apply (ITA) in an Express Entry draw, individuals are first required to meet the eligibility criteria of one of the three immigration programs managed through the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), Federal Skilled Trades Class (FTSC), or Canadian Experience Class (CEC). Upon entering the pool, candidates are assigned a CRS score based on factors including civil status information, education, work experience, language ability, and other criteria. This score determines their ranking in the pool, and candidates with the same score are ranked according to the date and time they submitted their profile. During periodic draws, IRCC issues ITAs to the highest-ranking candidates. Those candidates who receive an ITA  may submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status.

Prior to this update, all candidates in the pool with the minimum CRS score required at the time of a draw received an ITA. IRCC has stated that this '[made] it hard for the Department to manage invitation rounds.' 

Please consult the below table for an example. This table represents an example only and is not based on actual statistics from the Express Entry pool, or actual minimum CRS score required in order to receive an ITA in any specific draw. For example, if the minimum CRS score in a future draw is 419, and IRCC invites the top-ranked 3,300 candidates, the following may apply:

 

Rank CRS score Date and time of profile submission Status
3298 419 September 21, 2016, at 12:31:04 Invited to apply
3299 419 December 1, 2016, at 23:00:01 Invited to apply
3300 419 February 2, 2017, at 08:03:48 Invited to apply
3301 419 February 2, 2017, at 15:33:20 Still in the pool
3302 419 May 4, 2017, at 20:12:56 Still in the pool

 

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        0        2017/Jun/29

Quebec's Budget to Provide Funding for Integration of Immigrants

The province of Quebec has earmarked $179.4 million over the next five years to support the integration of new immigrants. This figure includes $13.5 million to attract international students and $103.5 million for francization of newcomers.

As part of the francization program, the government of Quebec provides free French language courses for recent immigrants who do not speak French or whose command of French is weak. The government also provides financial assistance for those who are unable to find employment because they are unable to speak French. Last July, the government launched a campaign to promote awareness of these programs among newcomers to Quebec.

As for attracting international students, the latest budget comes in the wake of previous announcements that may make Quebec an even more attractive study destination. Last October, the government of Quebec announced that it was to provide invest $1.6 million in a program to encourage international students in Montreal to remain in the province after graduation. More recently, Montreal, the largest city in Quebec, was identified by QS Rankings as the best city in the world for students in 2017. Montreal is home to more than 30 universities and colleges.

Students and foreign workers in Quebec may immigrate permanently through the Programme de l’expérience Québécoise (PEQ, or Quebec Experience Class). Among other criteria, this program requires applicants to prove advanced intermediate French ability.

Quebec also operates its own skilled worker program, which is currently not accepting new registrations, unless the applicant is exempt from the program cap. Cap-exempt candidates who have an employment offer validated by the government, as well as individuals who are temporary residents of Quebec and eligible to submit an application for Quebec Selection Certificate (Certificat de sélection du Québec, also known as a CSQ), may submit an application at any time.

In addition, Quebec processes immigration applications through its business immigration programs, as well as family sponsorship and refugee programs operated in conjunction with the federal government. The province aims to welcome 51,000 new permanent residents in 2017.

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        0        2017/Apr/13

More Skilled Workers Invited to Apply for Immigration to Manitoba in March 30 Draw

The Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP) continues to be a pathway to permanent residence for foreign skilled workers, including individuals overseas, as well as many who are already living and working in the province. On March 30, a total of 225 candidates who had previously made a formal Expression of Interest in settling in Manitoba as a skilled worker were invited to submit an application for a provincial nomination certificate to the MPNP. Following a successful nomination, a candidate may then apply to the federal government for permanent resident status.

The MPNP is a Canadian immigration program that allows the province of Manitoba to welcome new immigrants who have the ability to establish themselves and their families in Manitoba, based on eligibility criteria set by the province.

In the March 30 draw for skilled workers, 201 candidates have issued a Letter of Advice to Apply (LAA, known more informally as an invitation) under the criteria for the Skilled Workers in Manitoba sub-category.

The remaining 24 LAAs were issued to candidates in the Skilled Workers Overseas sub-category who were invited directly by the MPNP under a Strategic Recruitment Initiative.

These initiatives include:

  • Recruitment missions. These overseas employment/immigration fairs involve MPNP representatives interviewing foreign skilled workers and subsequently inviting them to apply after they have made a formal Expression of Interest (EOI) to the MPNP.
  • Exploratory visits. The MPNP may invite people who have undertaken a pre-approved Exploratory Visit and passed an interview with a program official.

Candidates eligible for one of the MPNP for Skilled Workers sub-categories are ranked according to a unique points system that awards up to 1,000 points to each candidate. In the March 30 draw, the points threshold required was lower than in the previous draw, which took place on March 16.

March 30 MPNP EOI draw for skilled workers

Sub-category Minimum score required to receive LAA Number of invitations
Skilled Workers in Manitoba 657 201
Skilled Workers Overseas 698 24

MPNP for Skilled Workers

The MPNP for Skilled Workers was established to help employers in Manitoba find foreign talent to complement their existing workforce. The government of Manitoba selects experienced workers who have made an Expression of Interest in immigrating to the province and who have the skills needed across the local labor market, and nominate them to receive a provincial nomination certificate from the MPNP. With this, the nominated person may then apply to the federal government for permanent resident status.

These immigration options may be particularly attractive to individuals who may not be eligible to immigrate to Canada through the federal Express Entry immigration selection system, as the eligibility requirements are different. For example, the MPNP awards points for language proficiency equivalent to Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 4 to candidates in certain occupations, a much lower threshold than what is required under the Federal Skilled Worker Class.

MPNP Skilled Workers in Manitoba

Under this sub-category of the MPNP, applications are accepted from qualified foreign workers and international student graduates who are currently working in Manitoba and have been offered a permanent job by their employer in Manitoba. Skilled Workers in Manitoba are not subject to a points-based assessment to determine their eligibility (though points are assigned to the candidate once he or she enters the pool of candidates)

MPNP Skilled Workers Overseas

This MPNP sub-category is for qualified skilled workers who may be outside Canada but who can demonstrate a strong connection to the province and its labor market. A points-based system is used to assess candidates according to factors such as age, language proficiency, work experience, education and adaptability.

Manitoba Profile

Population: 1.3 million

Capital and largest city: Winnipeg

Location: Manitoba is located in Central Canada and is considered one of the three "Prairie" provinces. Ontario lies to the east, with Saskatchewan sharing the western border. The US states of Minnesota and North Dakota are to the south, and the sparsely-populated north of the province has a long coastline on Hudson Bay leading to a border with the territory of Nunavut.

Economy: Manitoba’s principal industries are mining, manufacturing, and agriculture. Traditionally farming has been a major occupation for Manitobans, and the rich farmlands in southern Manitoba produce wheat, barley, oats, sunflower, flax and canola crops, as well as dairy and livestock farms. From this agricultural base, a considerable food processing industry has emerged. In addition, Manitoba is home to considerable manufacturing, aerospace and transportation industries. Winnipeg has a sizable financial and insurance industry, as well as government administration and services.

Climate: Manitoba is far from the moderating influences of mountain ranges or large bodies of water. Moreover, given its size, it experiences great variations in temperature. In Southern Manitoba, where the vast majority of the population resides, cold, snowy winters are the norm. Summers are typically hot and dry, with short transitional seasons ensuring that residents get a full four-season experience.

 

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        0        2017/Apr/13

Newfoundland Targets 50 Percent Increase in Immigration Numbers by 2022

The government of Newfoundland and Labrador wants annual immigration numbers to increase to 1,700 new permanent residents per year, an increase of around 50 percent on current intake numbers.

The target was announced at the launch of a new strategy document last Friday in St. John's, the provincial capital and largest city. The plan is titled 'The Way Forward on Immigration in Newfoundland and Labrador.'

Speaking at the launch, provincial Labour Minister Gerry Byrne stated that, "Even in this economy — you could argue because of this economy — there are skill sets that are left unfulfilled and unanswered . . . The argument is actually made and effectively made, and effectively made, this is the best time to come to Newfoundland and Labrador."

Also included in the 26-page document are efforts to improve immigrant retention rates, as well as strategies to entice Newfoundlanders to return to their home province.

The plan is divided into two broad phases, with the first phase encompassing the year 2017, and the subsequent phase covering 2018 to 2022. Of the 39 initiatives outlined, 24 are scheduled to be rolled out in phase one.

Initiatives for 2017 include improved application processing procedures, working with third parties on settlement services, expanding and improving the provincial government's immigration websites, and the possibility of new categories within the Newfoundland And Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP), one of Canada's Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs).

By 2022, the province aims to have built on these initial efforts with further initiatives, including a new portal that would allow applicants and employers to track their progress in relation to the NLPNP.

Currently, there are a number of ways for newcomers to settle in Newfoundland and Labrador as permanent residents:

The NLPNP

This program has streams for skilled workers (including skilled workers in the federal Express Entry pool) and international graduates. The NLPNP is currently responsible for almost 50 percent of all immigration to the province.

The Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program (AIPP)

New for 2017, the AIPP is a program that allows the four Atlantic provinces (N.L, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick), together with the federal government, to bring in more workers and graduates to these provinces. The AIPP has two programs for skilled workers:

  • Atlantic High-Skilled Program (AHSP), and
  • Atlantic Intermediate-Skilled Program (AISP),

and one program for international student graduates:

  • Atlantic International Graduate Program (AIGP).

Federal programs

The government of Canada, through the department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) operates a number of federal economic immigration programs, namely the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), the Federal Skilled Trades Class (FSTC), and the Canadian Experience Class (CEC). These programs are managed within the Express Entry selection system.

Other newcomers to Newfoundland may come through family sponsorship programs or as refugees.

 

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        2        2017/Apr/13

March 24 Express Entry Draw: 3,749 Candidates Invited

The second Express Entry of the March, and the 57th in total, has taken place. A total of 3,749 candidates were issued an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for immigration to Canada, with each invited candidate having 441 or more Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points at the time the draw was performed.

Candidates who receive an ITA are now in a position to submit an application for Canadian permanent residence to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). Accompanying family members, including spouses or common-law partners, as well as dependent children, may also come to Canada along with the principal applicant.

Candidates who receive an ITA are now in a position to submit an application for Canadian permanent residence to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). Accompanying family members, including spouses or common-law partners, as well as dependent children, may also come to Canada along with the principal applicant.

CRS Requirement Number of ITAs in latest draw ITAs issued in 2017
441 3,749 24,652

In order to be in a position to receive an ITA in an Express Entry draw, individuals are first required to meet the eligibility criteria of one of the three immigration programs managed through the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC), Federal Skilled Trades Class (FTSC), or Canadian Experience Class (CEC). Upon entering the pool, candidates are assigned a CRS score based on factors including civil status information, education, work experience, language ability, and other criteria. This score determines their ranking in the pool. During periodic draws, IRCC issues ITAs to the highest-ranking candidates. Those candidates who receive an ITA  may submit an application for Canadian permanent resident status.

Express Entry quick facts, from January 1, 2015 to March 24, 2017

  • Launch date: January 1, 2015
  • First draw from the pool: January 31, 2015
  • Most recent draw from the pool: March 24, 2017
  • Minimum CRS points required for selection in any one draw: 434 (March 1, 2017)
  • Largest number of invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 3,884 (March 1, 2017)
  • Fewest invitations to apply issued in any one draw: 559 (November 30, 2016. Note: This draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Largest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 273 (from May 22, 2015 to June 12, 2015 draws)
  • Smallest decrease in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • Largest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 316 (from November 16, 2016 to November 30. Note: The latter draw invited candidates with a provincial nomination only.)
  • Smallest increase in CRS points required between two consecutive draws: 0 (on three occasions)
  • Longest gap between two consecutive draws: 35 days (from April 17, 2015 to May 22, 2015 draws)
  • Shortest gap between two consecutive draws: 6 days (from December 16 to December 22, 2016)
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2015: 31,063
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2016: 33,782
  • Total number of ITAs issued in 2017: 24,652
  • Total number of ITAs issued since system was launched:89,487

Draws From The Express Entry Pool (Updated)

Express Entry Draws: 2017

Draw # Minimum CRS Score Required Date of Draw # of ITAs Issued
57 441 March 24, 2017 3,749
56 434 March 1, 2017 3,884
55 441 February 22, 2017 3,611
54 447 February 8, 2017 3,664
53 453 January 25, 2017 3,508
52 459 January 11, 2017 3,334
51 468 January 4. 2017 2,902

 

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        0        2017/Apr/13

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